About Me

My Photo

Quilt maker,folkartist,writer, from Freestone County, Tx.

WELCOME TO QUILTS AND STORIES BY SHERRY ANN

We appreciate your visit and hope you will enjoy yourself today.Please recommend us to your friends. Thanks and have a wonderful visit.ENJOY!!!!

Translate

Search This Blog

Loading...

Books about African American Quilts

UNCONVENTIONAL AND UNEXPECTED QUILTS

Sunday, September 1, 2013

LONE STAR BRAGGIN' RIGHTS: Freestone County,Texas Culture and History documented on cloth.( Blocks VII and XII)




English: Map of Freestone County Texas highlig...
English: Map of Freestone County Texas highlighting Teague (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


The Sim / Simms Family and Others



These two quilt blocks are featured in reverse order because they both feature members of the Sim / Simms  pioneer family of Freestone County, Texas....but quilt block 12 features the majority of the names.  Therefore we will start with it in identifying  the family members....

The Sim / Simms family were pioneers who settled and established Simsboro, Texas. Their stories are featured in the History of  Freestone County, Texas, Volumes I and II.  Story # 754 titled Sims, Sterling Family, Volume I, page 575, introduces us to this amazing story in the quote that follows:
"The Sims family, along with seventeen slaves ( a second account says sixteen slaves.), came from Thomas county, Georgia up the Trinity River from Galveston to Navarro Crossing and on to Freestone County in ox wagons ,where they built their log cabin. It was built in 1852 when the buffalo were still roaming the prairies at will. Deer, wild turkey and other wild game were in abundance as were friendly Indians who hunted them. 
******************
Interesting Historical Note: 

The book Africans in America, by Charles Johnson and Patricia Smith, on page 223...says in reference to the Sims /Simms family....

"a slave, named Dick ...owned by a Mr. Wm. Sims was hanged near Charleston South Carolina, on Friday, 26th, July,1822..., along with other slaves because of intended insurrection in which Denmark Vesey played a part..." 



Africans in America: Journey Through Slavery

A second book called Slavery In America (Rebels): From Colonial Times to the
 Civil War by Dorothy Schneider and Carl J. Schneider  also chronicles the hanging 
of the slave "Dick"and mentions Wm. Sims as his owner, on pages 72-73.




********************




**************************************

"INDIANS"
************

NOTES OF INTEREST 
***(Freestone County was a favorite hunting and trading ground for many Indian tribes. Some even traded furs with Mr. James Hall who owned a trading post at Hall's Bluff , or as it later became known,  West Point in Freestone county. 
They also fought battles between the various tribes in this area. Most of the tribes were nomadic and did not have permanent dwelling in the county...but visited on a regular basis for the purpose mostly of hunting and trading. Freestone county abounded with wild game.  Some of the tribes who may have visited the area are mentioned below:
  Plains Indians and the Buffalo
...."Plains Indians are usually divided into two broad classifications which overlap to some degree. The first group became fully nomadic and dependent upon the horse during the 18th and 19th centuries, following the vast herds of buffalo, although some tribes occasionally engaged in agriculture; growing tobacco and corn primarily. These include: Blackfoot, Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Gros Ventre, Kiowa,Lakota Sioux, Lipan, Plains Apache (or Kiowa Apache), Plains Cree, Plains Ojibwe, Sarsi, Nakoda (Stoney), and Tonkawa.
The second group of plains Indians includes the aboriginal peoples of the Great Plains, as well as the Prairie Indians who come from as far east as the Mississippi River. These tribes were semi-sedentary, and, in addition to hunting buffalo, they lived in villages, raised crops, and actively traded with other tribes. These include the Arikara, Hidatsa, Iowa, Kaw (or Kansa), Kitsai, Mandan, Missouria, Omaha, Osage,Otoe, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Wichita, and the Santee, Yanktonai and Yankton Sioux. )"

************
History of Freestone County, Volume I, pages 7-8, 
The Early History of Freestone County 
by Phillip Dale Brown

( Mr. Brown discusses the Indians and their direct affects 
upon the settlement of Freestone and adjoining counties.)

Evolution of the County to 1850
" The nineteenth century was ushered in, in Texas with American filibustering expeditions. Perhaps the most famous of these was the Nolan-Bean, expedition of 1800-1801. Though highly interesting reading, the account of the expedition is not within the province of this subject except to say that the route of Nolan and his comrades, or at least that of the pursuit party of Mexican soldiers under Lieutenant Muzquiz, lay partly within the territory now covered by Anderson, Leon, Limestone, McLennan, and Freestone counties.  In the connection, it is interesting to note the geographic position of Freestone county in relation to that International episode. 
From 1801 on for some twenty- four years, the Indians, with perhaps no interference, remained in possession of those solitudes together with the denizens of the woods, and the game they hunted....
In the early eighteen-twenties Mexico opened  the door of Texas to American colonization, and by the national law of  August 18,1824, and the state of Coahuila and Texas of  March 24,1825, opened its uninhibited tracts to contractors, or impresarios...( such as Hayden Edwards, April 18, 1825, Joseph Velein, David G. Burnet, and Lorenzo De Zavala)...The area which was to become Freestone county in 1850, lay within the heart of Burnet's grant....
....Subsequent to the Act of repeal on March 25, 1834, and previous to the Texas War for Independence, twenty - four titles to land lying within Freestone county were issued from the land office at Nacogdoches ... All of the Leagues, except those of Longbotham, McAnulty, and Jose Maria Sanchez lay wholly within the county.  In the center of the county was the Redin Gainer league, upon which was to be located the county seat, Fairfield, in 1851.

The Freestone County Courthouse located in Fai...
The Freestone County Courthouse located in Fairfield, Texas, United States. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It must be remembered that the surveying, and granting of titles to these persons, does not imply that they took up residence on the land. In 1835 there was probably one white resident within the present limits of the county. That man was James Hall a fur trader. Hall's trading Post served as a sort of way station for the party of surveyors, headed by I. W. Burton, who laid out the surveys of 1835.


It was with this surveying party that the only recorded incident of a near clash between red men and white occurred within the limits of Freestone. In August of that year (1835) a large band of Keechi Indians, incensed over a raid on one of their villages, by white frontiersmen, a short while before, surrounded Burton's party and threatened it with death. But good fortune attended the party that day. They professed friendship for the Indians and said that they had come to steal land from the enemies of the Keechis. The 'land stealer', as the surveyor's compass was called was offered as evidence. By this bit of strategy and misrepresentation of truth , for which they successfully gave the trader Hall as voucher, they escaped with their lives....

....The problem of what white settlers were in the region under discussion , before 1850, is one of unavoidable uncertainty. Within the present limits of Freestone county there is neither evidence nor hint of white settlers, with the single exception of the trader James Hall, before the Indian treaty of 1843. It was in 1834 that James Hall moved his stock of goods from Bean's Saline, in the southwest corner of present Smith county, to a location on the west side of the Trinity, then known as Hall's Bluff, and later was West Point, for the purpose of trading with the Indian tribes from the prairies to the west.
In the surrounding area settlers were making locations as early as 1834, sometime in that year. Parker's Fort, a block- house near the Navasota River in Limestone county, was built. In April, two years later, the entire region was vacated during the " runaway scrape". Scarcely had the exit begun before the joyful news of the victory at San Jacinto caused the settlers to return to their homes. On May 19, 1836 a raiding band of Comanches and Kiowas attacked and destroyed Parker's Fort. ( Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped. She became the mother of Quanah Parker...the last great Indian Chief. ) The survivors found their way to Fort Houston, near present Palestine in Anderson county, which had been established some time previous to the Parker's Fort Massacre. This blow was effective in checking the spread of settlements in that region..... 
....Indian depredations were rife in 1838 and 1839. In the area now covered by Navarro county two parties of surveyors were attacked with disastrous results to themselves, by migratory, warlike Kickapoos during the summer and in October of 1838. During that same year and throughout the first half of the next, it was frequently reported that the Indians about the Neches Saline persistently engaged in thievery and occasional murder of whites. These alleged depredations and possible desires of some whites for Indian lands resulted in the expulsion of the Cherokees from East Texas. Following these activities several companies of rangers or minute men were formed for frontier protection. For the region between the Navasota and the Trinity a block -house was built in 1839, on Boggy Creek, in present Leon county. Within a year settlers began to move northward and settle near the fort. The establishment of some protection and especially the Indian treaty a few years later, gave a great impetus to settlement. So great was the influx of population following the Indian treaty that by the end of the year 1846 every county now bounding Freestone attained organization as such. Leon, and Anderson were created in March 1846, and organized on July 13 of the same year. Limestone, (which then included Freestone), Navarro, and Henderson were created in April, 1846. The last two being organized on July 13, and Limestone on August 18. 

Limestone county, which then included not only all of Freestone, but a bit of the eastern portion of McLennan and Falls grew very rapidly during the next four years. J. D. DeBow, in his Statistical View of the United States, (being a compendium of the United States census for 1850), shows that the big county,which was to become two counties, had a white population of only ten less than two thousand, and that the number of slaves was six hundred and eighteen. This population had an abundant supply of horses, mules, meat cattle, sheep, and swine. While fields and gardens, produced bountiful supplies of wheat, oats, rye, Indian corn, Irish and sweet potatoes, peas and beans, barley, hay, tobacco, and cotton."

**********************

The Sterling Sims family moved to Texas in 1852, one year after Freestone county was established and organized. The Indian conditions had been stabilized, but the Civil War was in the making.

*************
This family (Sim / Simms) left a definite imprint upon the history of Freestone County, aside from the fact that it's name has been perpetuated in the name of  the town of Simsboro where they settled...."
Sterling Sims was born 1798 in South Carolina.  He and his wife, Sarah Fitzpatrick Heard were parents of 15 children...
Judge T.W. Sims, who was county Clerk of Freestone county,

T. J. Sims, Sr. who was elected as Deputy Clerk, Clerk and Treasurer, 
(William) Faulkner Sims, who lost his life in the Battle of Fort Donaldson,
J. M. (Joseph Marion)? Sims who did general merchandising and ginning business at Cotton Gin, Texas;
Mary Jane (Sims) McMulliens,  only daughter to reach maturity and her husband bought a farm a mile east of Simsboro facing the old road from Fairfield to Mexia, though neither town was established at the time.
History of Freestone County, volume I, story # 755, page 575, Sims, Sterling
 by Avery C. McKenny 
"....Mary, had a boyfriend that Sterling did not like, so Sterling hid in a tree and took a shot at him...it was not long before Mary had another boy friend and said that she was going to marry him.  Sterling thought that since this one was a Preacher he might be all right, so Mary was married at the age of eleven to Rev. Franklin McMillan.  Franklin and Mary came to Texas and settled one mile east of Simsboro.  Their old pine, pear, and fig trees are still living after more than 125 years.  Mary wrote back to her parents and told them about all of the game and how pretty the country was.
In 1851 Sterling received his share of his father's estate, they left Pensacola, Florida by boat for Freestone county by way of New Orleans and Galveston....."
********************* 
 George Anderson Sims was well-to-do farmer in the Simsboro community. He served in the War between the States. His wife was Charity Jane Manning.("...Charity Jane Manning -Sims was born 1-5-1839 / d. 6-20-1880. (She was a quilt maker as noted by her grandson John Sims Newell. 
"....The Newell family has in safe keeping the quilt , the wedding gift to Mary Catherine Sims from her mother Charity Jane Manning-Sims.  The marriage date 11-26-1873 indicates the quilt is more than 100 years ( at least 115) old. The quilt is "Tree if Life" pattern , constructed of red and green calico on white.  The stitches are unbelievably small and beautiful."
************ 
History of Freestone county, Volume II, stories # 5l9, Dwaine Rufus by Patty Hargis Manning and #520, John Manning by Debbie Roberts, page 348.
Charity Jane Manning-Sims was born and raised on one of the earliest Trinity River Plantations. The Mannings were large landholders.  They were prominent people and considered wealthy by ate-bellum measure. The men of the family ...John Manning, Reuben Manning, and Joseph Manning...served in the Confederate Army as the muster rolls indicate. When the South lost the war, a plantation became a hardship. It wasn't an easy task running a plantation after the defeat of the South--the slaves were gone--the economy of the state decimated and the carpetbag regime imposing high taxes on all property. There were lean years of Reconstruction.  The State of Texas was under marshal Law from 1869-73. Many land owners went broke and it was a tribute to those who hung on."
  Their children of George Anderson and Charity Jane Sims were:

        Mary Catherine Sims-Newell, married Joseph Newell (b. 2-4-1845 / d. 3-6- 1926)

History of Freestone county, Volume II, story #609, Newell, Mr. and Mrs John Sims by Catherine Newell Elliott
".....The mother of John Sims Newell was Mary Catherine (Sims) Newell. She was the eldest member of the George AndersonSims and Charity Jane Manning-Sims family.  The Sims were prominent early pioneers.  They arrived in Texas in 1852.  The Sims family traces its history back to 1700 in America to Matthew Sims who came from Somerset, England.  
George Anderson Sims, father of Mary Catherine Sims-Newell ( and grandfather of John Sims Newell of Wortham) was a prosperous farmer and landholder in the Simsboro area.
....The Newell family has in safe keeping the quilt , the wedding gift to Mary Catherine Sims from her mother Charity Jane Manning-Sims.  The marriage date 11-26-1873 indicates the quilt is more than 100 years ( at least 115) old. The quilt is "Tree if Life" pattern , constructed of red and green calico on white.  The stitches are unbelievably small and beautiful.
Mrs. E.V. Head lee ,of Teague , Texas 
...married Dr.Emory Vincent (E.V.) Headlee, son of Dr. Emmett Headlee.  Emory followed in his father's foot steps and also became a doctor. 
Dr. Emmett Headlee (b. 1848-d.1918) The town Teagues' first doctor, came to Texas in 1866. He was a planter, church leader, peace officer, Brewer's 1st postmaster,Banker, druggist, school trustee, Mason,Citizen,Civic leader and one of the two men (the other being T.J. Blackmon) credited with bringing the Trinity and Brazos Valley Railroad on the route through Brewer and in establishing the town of Teague.  March 1906, Dr. Headlee was the first to  buy property and move to the new town site.  He constructed the first home in the present day city of Teague.  Although not on  the original spot, the two story Q structure still stands and is identified by a State Historical Marker (1978).
***********************
  Mrs. J.C. Chumney, ( Linda Sims-Chumney?  b. 1879 -d. 1968) of Teague ,Texas....married Dr.John C. Chumney (b. 1878 - d.1937)

....delivered her niece, 

" Willie Mae Howell / Owens (who) was one of the few children born in the Brewer community before it became the town of Teague.  Midwifery was performed by Mrs. J.C. Chumney at three o'clock in the morning in the residence of the child's parents, William Augustus Howell and wife, Sallie Fitzhugh Sims / Howell, July 27, 1890....."

History of Freestone County, volume II, story #636, page 399. Owens, Mrs. Horace W. (formerly Willie Mae Howell) by Weldon Owens

***********************
Mrs. W. H. Howell (Sallie Fitzhugh Sims) ,of Teague,Texas
 ...married William Augustus Howell. She was the daughter of George Anderson Sims and Charity Jane Manning-Sims.(Charity Jane was a quilt maker.)

Sallie's grandparents were Sterling Sims and Sarah Fitzpatrick Heard-Sims.
(Sallie Fitzhugh Sims -Howell's name is also located on Row2 / Block VII of this signature quilt.) 
They had one daughter named Willie Mae (Willie) Howell (b.7-27-1899 / d. 5-24- 1977). "Willie" or "Miss Willie", as she was called, married Horace W. Owens ( b. 1885- d. 1945), the Chief of  Police, Teague,Texas. They wed on August 17, 1907.  
( Mrs. Horace Howell is listed at Row 6 / Block XXX on this signature quilt, along side the name of her daughter Opaline Owens.)  Her personal legacy appears in the History of Freestone county, volume II, story # 636, page 399. 
"....her incredible talents with fabric, needle and sewing machine were recognized, and her own love for employing those talents for both herself and other laid foundation for her reputation as a seamstress of real artistry." 
However , throughout her adult life her career for more than 40 years with N.W. Bendy Company embraced her equal talent in salesmanship for which she was honored by Teague townsmen and especially local merchants as "Saleslady of the Year".Her bubbling countenance behind the Bendy store counters gradually , no doubt, contributed to everybody within borders of Teague trade territory calling her "Miss Willie"..."  
 Willie Mae Howell-Owens is a Sims family descendant.  She is the Great granddaughter of Sterling Sims, the granddaughter of George Anderson and Charity Jane Manning-Sims and the daughter of William Augustus and Sallie Fitzhugh Sims-Howell . Quilt Row 2 / Block VII. 
Willie came from a long lineage of quilt makers, painters and crafts men and women.  She was well respected in the community ( of Teague, Texas) and known for her sewing skills.  She is listed with her daughter, Opal Owens on Quilt row 6, Block XXX of this signature quilt. 
Note: Knowing Willie's background and knowledge of sewing skills, the position of her name on this signature quilt leads me to wonder if she may perhaps be the person who stitched the top together and embroidered the names...maybe even quilting the complete Textile, also. Her female family members were very skilled in the arts...from painting to quilt making...and would surely understand that a good artist signs his/her work when it is finished.  Willie's signature is placed in the lower right hand corner area of block XXX, approximately where an artist would place a signature on most any work of art. It causes one to ponder "Why this area for her name...since she was a noted seamstress of the town and area?" 
Horace and Willie Owens had (3) children: 
Weldon Owens....Worked 23 years as a daily columnist and broadcaster for the Dallas Times Herald and Radio KRLD.  Then he retired. 
Opal Owens-Tucker....was employed for the Cox Department Store chain for many years in Fort Worth, TX, before retiring. 
Wroe Owens...graduated from the University of Texas where he received his law degree and established law offices.  However during the J. Edgar Hoover regime, he joined the Federal Bureau of Investigation and as Special agent and was prestigious cited for World War II prisoners security. After the war, he returned to reopen his law offices in Austin where he has long been active in various Masonic civic and chamber of commerce activities. After assigning most responsibilities of this law firm to his son-in-law , he has been retained as consultant and resides in Austin with his wife Dorothy.
                                                     ********************
Mrs. Clara Glanton, of Teague ,Texas_( b. October 27,1872 - January 27, 1941)
_married Charles F. Glanton...    
******************* 
Mrs. Austin King, Mexia ,Texas...  
 "Austin Kings father, M. A. King and his
mother, Mrs. Helen King moved from Montgomery Alabama in 1844 and settled at Fairfield. Eight years later in 1852 they settled the old King homestead about 1 &1 1/2 miles North of Teague. Here Austin King and his brother and sisters were reared.  
About 40 years ago he moved from the old place to
Mexia, which he has since made his home. He belong to one of the Pioneer Families of this county."
                                                      Austin King Obituary  
ANOTHER PIONEER ANSWERS TO LAST CALL,
Fairfield Recorder, Fairfield Texas
Friday, Feb. 13, 1925
AUSTIN KING DIES AT HIS
HOME IN MEXIA
******************* 
Tom Sims, Wortham ,Texas
******************* 
Mrs. S. A. Mitchell, Langley ,Texas
****************** 
Joe Sims , Winters ,Texas
******************** 
Sterling Sims, a farmer and rancher of Streetman,Texas.  Married first, Aurelia Chumney, ...second wife was Emily (Emma) Cooper....
**************** 

*(Children of Sterling Sims and Sarah Fitzpatrick continued) 

Francis Sims died in Thomas County, GA


Mark Sims (2) died in Thomas County, GA


Elizabeth Sims died in Thomas County, GA


Joseph (Joe) Heard Sims  b. 1849 in Florida....Joe owned a large 2 story general merchandise store at Simsboro.  He sold this store about 1897 to Hugh Day and opened a store on the second floor over a blacksmith shop at Cotton Gin.  He later bought the old two general merchandise store and post office at Cotton Gin and was Postmaster from 1900 to 1908.  Joe owned a modern steam gin, Cotton was King then and his steam gin ran 24 hours a day.  Joe married Willie Roberts and their children were:

Henry Sims

Bessie Sims
Josie Sims
Mary Sims
Guy Sims
Mack Sims
Stella Sims
Verna Sims

Joe married a second time to Carrie Bell Patton. Their son was:


Marion Sims


**************************************************

Row III / Block 12


*( corner names )

Mr. W. H. ? Sims
LeNere Sims
Anlin Sims
Mrs. W. H. Sims
*****************
Mrs. J. N. Sims
Mr. J. N . Sims
Mr. Tom Sims
Mr. M. M. Sims
Mrs. ? T. J. Sims
Miss Eula Sims
Mrs. Mack Sims
Miss Irene Sims
Mr. Edwin Sims
Mrs. R. L. Sims
Mr. R. L. Sims
Mrs J. W. Sims
Mr. J. W. Simms
Mrs. F. F. Sims
Mr. F. F. Sims
Mr. Marion Sims


**********************************


*( corner names )

Mr. W. H.Sims (William Hugh Sims)

"William Hugh Sims....son of Thomas W. Sims and Malinda Rutherford, was born on December 25, 1876. Being of and irrepressibly merry disposition, he often commented that the whole world celebrated his birthday.  On November 20, 1898, he married Vida Moss Colgin, eldest daughter or Richard Ewing Colgin ( b. Dec. 31, 1839; died July 9, 1922. "


Hugh was a Burlington -Rock Island locomotive engineer the better part of his working life, from 1904 to about a year before his death on June 28, 1931. ...( They built a house on 6th street in Teague that Vida designed and lived there the rest of their lives.) Vida taught piano lessons for over 30 years...


Hugh and Vida had two daughters, LeNere (Alderman) and Anlin (Price).


****************

LeNere Sims (Daughter of William Hugh Sims and Vida Colgin-Sims) Lenere married David William (Dave) Alderman.

(History of Freestone county,volume II, story # 001, page125, Alderman David William and LeNere Sims by Annie Lin Alderman Risinger) ....Quilt row 3 / Block VII


"David Alderman was born August 5, 1885, on his parents farm north of Cotton Gin (Texas). He was the eldest son of James W. Alderman, Sr. and Ella (Jordan) Alderman.

Dave grew up on the farm and helped his mother operate it as he became "the man of the house" at a very early age when his father died in 1893.  Farming was his favorite field of endeavor, and although he pursued other occupations during his career, he always returned to it. 

Dave and his brothers, Roger Q. and James W., Jr. bought the Cotton Gin General Merchandise Store in 1918 from Joseph H. Sims. He continued to look after the land while his brothers tended to the store. It was during this period he met LeNere Sims, who was visiting relatives, and Joseph H. Sims family in Cotton Gin.  The courtship blossomed and he began calling upon her at her parents' home in Teague.  They were married June 5, 1920, and moved to Kirvin, (Texas).....


He was a great storyteller and had a tremendous storehouse of anecdotes with which he entertained family and friends.  He was not a very demonstrative man, but he was fiercely protective of those close to him.  He was loved and respected by all with whom he had any dealings---from field hands to business associates..."



"LeNere was born December 22, 1900, the eldest daughter of William Hugh and Vida Moss Colgin- Sims. She was a rather shy young girl who bloomed after her marriage and became an excellent  homemaker, seamstress, and cook although Dave often teased that he had to teach her to make cornbread and her first housekeeper had to teach her to sew.  She was a wonderful mother to her daughters---allowing terrible messes in the kitchen and around the sewing machine while they were in the throes of learning.  A birthday invitation usually prompted a quick trip to the Cotton Gin store for fabric to make new party dresses."


Dave and LeNere had four children:


Ellalie (Mrs. John M. Martin, born November 26, 1921; died August 16, 1983)


Annie Lin, Mrs Berry Risinger ( born May 16, 1923)


A baby boy( died at birth)


Betty, Mrs Billie V. Banta, (born June 27,1934



**************************

Anlin Sims...Daughter of William Hugh Sims and Vida Colgin-Sims...married Edward Ollington Price ) ...History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #686, page 421, by Hugh Ann Price-Bankhead.

"Anlin Sims -Price was born August 25, 1903, in Mexia, Texas, to W. Hugh and Vida Colgin Sims. She graduated from Teague High School in 1920, and attended Texas Presbyterian College in Wilford, Texas. In her Senior year there, she won the senior scholarship. She was president of the Scholarship Society, business manager of the Blue Quill, and senior representative on the Student Council.  Anlin was also the Queen of the Way. She graduated in 1925. She later continued her education with a Master of Education degree earned in 1952 from Sam Houston State Teachers in Huntsville, Texas. 


On June 2, 1926, she married Edward Ollington Price who was born August 25, 1887, in Lacy, Arkansas.  Edward was a cotton buyer in the early days of Teague. Later he owned a 600 acre ranch between Dew and Donie...


Anlin and Edward moved into their home at 400 Maple Street in Teague and lived in that home until her death except for a short time in Donie....she taught in Teague for a number of years.She was a very dedicated teacher and her desire was to help make Teague schools great.  She became a member of Delta Kappa Gamma Society,...the Daughters of the American Revolution...She was an active member of the Teague Methodist Church...."


Anlin and Edward had three children:


E.O (Ed) Price, Jr.

Hugh Ann Price-Bankhead
David William (Bill) Price


********************** 

Mrs. W. H. Sims...( Vida Moss Colgin-Sims, wife of William Hugh Sims)

"William Hugh Sims....son of Thomas W. Sims and Malinda Rutherford, was born on December 25, 1876. Being of and irrepressibly merry disposition, he often commented that the whole world celebrated his birthday.  On November 20, 1898, he married Vida Moss Colgin, eldest daughter or Richard Ewing Colgin ( b. Dec. 31, 1839; died July 9, 1922. )



(History of Freestone county, volume II, story # 784, page 464, Sims, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. , by LeNere Sims Alderman)

Vida's father, Richard Ewing (b. December 31, 1839 -d. July 9, 1922), enlisted into the Confederate Army, Company D of the 10th Texas Infantry with Capt. Wilson Nelson's Regiment, Walker's Division.  He was captured but escaped and reported to Little Rock, Ark., where he was mounted as cavalry and attached to Young's Brigade.  In 1864 he was captured and sent to Elmira Prison.  When he was released 11 months later, he made trousers and jacket from his prison blanket in which to make his way home to Freestone County.....Richard Ewing was one of four children born to Richard Colgin and Elizabeth Wills...



Wills Family Lineage

Richard Ewing Colgin's family built the first smokehouse in Freestone county, Texas. 
They created the above product for curing smoked meats ( Called Colgin's Liquid Smoke).
Two years after his first wife, Mary Wallace Aycock's death, Richard married  Annie Elizabeth Drake (b. August 11, 1847 - December 21, 1932) . This union produced  seven children:...Vida Moss (b. April, 19, 1877, (was one of them.)

Children of Richard Ewing Colgin and Mary Wallace Aycock-Colgin were:


Frances Irene Colgin

Saladin Eugene Colgin

Children of Richard Ewing Colgin and Annie Elizabeth Drake were:


Vida Moss Colgin (born April 19, 1877)

Clay Wilma Colgin ( born April 3, 1878)
Roger Ewing Colgin (born October 14, 1881)
Thomas Guthrie Colgin (born December 20,1882)
Iona Elizabeth Colgin ( born February 17, 1885)
Richard Emory Colgin (born August 11, 1887)
Nancy Drake Colgin ( born March 3, 1890)

Hugh and Vida had two daughters


LeNere (Alderman) 

 Anlin (Price).


*****************

Mrs. J. N. Sims


Mr. J. N . Sims


Mr. Tom Sims  (Thomas Whaley Sims, Jr.)?


Mr. M. M. Sims


Mrs. ? T. J. Sims... Taylor Jackson Sims...(1st wife-Martha Helen Ferrell or 2nd wife-Fannie Cottondale)

Frank Fitzpatrick Simsb. June 28, 1870 in Fairfield, Texasdied in 1952 


(History of Freestone county, Volume I, story #751. page 573) Oldest son of Malinda Rutherford and Thomas Whaley Sims, Sr.  Frank and his wife, Corin lived in Cotton Gin, Texas and Frank worked in a General mercantile store--one of the earliest stores in Freestone county.


" The Sims family has traced their family in this country through 27 generations. One of the earliest members of the Sims family to come to this country was Matthew Sims, who settled in Hanover County, Virginia in 1700.  Matthew came from Somerset, England.  Following the Revolutionary War quite a number of his descendants moved to Union County, South Carolina, and descendants from South Carolina group later moved to Georgia.  It was from the Georgia group that the Freestone County Sims family is immediately descended.  Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Sims (Franks' grandparents), their 4 children and 17 slaves arrived in Freestone county in 1852 and settled a few miles northwest of the present site of Teague and purchased 490 acres of land.


Thomas W. (Whaley) Sims, (Franks' father) was born January 26, 1845 in South Georgia and was one of the sons of the Sterling Sims family. Thomas fought in the Civil War and lost an arm and a brother  in the war. 


 Malinda Rutherford was born, June 4, 1849. Thomas and Malinda were married, September 8, 1869 in Cotton Gin, Freestone County, Tx. ...( Malinda owned a boarding house in Teague on Pecan Street and Sixth, after her husband died.)


Prior to her marriage Malinda attended the Fairfield Female College.  This college was established in 1857.  The fame of the college spread and young ladies from all over Texas and the southern states attended...."( Some of the  taught to female students at this college were :


Ancient languages ( Latin and Greek)

Moral and Intellectual philosophy
Mathematics
English literature
Ornamental Department / Graded preparatory department
*Embroidery
*Chenille
*Fancy Work
(20 week course that cost $15 per session)

Piano / music....$25 per 20 week course / Use of instrument $5.00


Drawing

Painting in Water colors, Grecian ornamental and oil painting...$20 / 20 week course.


*********************************

(Frank ) married Corin Johnson (b.August 26, 1879 - October 26,1900) on December 24, 1895. Her legacy is found at History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #780, page 463. Her father was R.T. Johnson (b. 12-13-1830 / died 12-19-1890).Her mother was Sue M. Johnson (b.12-2-1847 / d. 3-19-1899)  Corin had two brothers, Lloyd and Walter Johnson. 


"Corin was a schoolteacher and also on the Examining Board in Austin for other teachers.

She painted very large oil paintings---48"x 36"  They were "Christmas Morn", "Easter Dawn", "Pharaoh's Horses.  She also painted a three section screen.  She pieced quilts and embroidered where the pieces were joined.  All of these paintings and quilts were made during the early part of 1890s."

Frank and Corin had one daughter Ezra Lucille Sims born February 16, 1897. 


Corin died in childbirth , October 26, 1900. She and her infant son  were buried together in the Fairfield cemetery...."



Note:

Ezra Lucille Sims (b. 2-16-1897 - d. 6-27-1987) married Thomas Hebert Neyland,Sr.

Lucille was the grand daughter of Sterling Sims. 

Her legacy is found at History of Freestone County, volume II,story # 613, page 389. Neyland, Lucille Sims by Linda Neyland- Epperson.  She is listed on this signature quilt at Quilt Row 4 / Block XIX.

Her parents were Frank Fitzpatrick Sims and Corin Johnson-Sims.  Since Corin's mother died when she was 3 years old, she was raised by her grandmother, Malinda Rutherford-Sims.....

Her step mother was Madge Keating-Sims of St. Louis, Mo.

She married Thomas Herbert Neyland, Sr. ( b. 9-22-1890 - d.9-13-1961) on December 3, 1916.

Lucille loved to dance, paint and play golf. ...She took oil painting lessons from Maggie Withrow.

Lucille did all alterations for T.H. Neyland and Co.Dry Goods Store.

Their children were:

Lula Frances ( b. 1-4-1919 -d. 1-5- 1919)

Corin Louise Neyland -Stroud -Forke ( b. 3-12-1920 -d....)

...was born in Teague March 12, 1920, the second daughter of Thomas Herbert (b. 9-22-1890 - d. 9-13- 1961) and Lucille Sims-Neyland ( b. 2-16-1897-d.6-27-1987)......(History of Freestone County, Volume II, story # 269, pages 240, Forke, Corin Neyland by Barbara Stroud - Cannon.)

"Corin was married first to Philip Edmond Stroud...He played softball and worked for Missouri Pacific in Palestine....


Second Corin was married to Howard Beall Forke, In 1932 he moved to Teague with his parents and sister when his parents opened Forke's Variety Store on Main Street. Beall worked for his parents until he joined the Naval Air Force in 1942.  For three years he served in the South Pacific as a Gunner.  In 1945 he was discharged from the Navy at Corpus Christi Naval Air Station.  (History of Freestone County, Volume II, story # 270, pages 240-41, Forke, Howard Beall by Corin Neyland Stroud Forke.)



When Beall returned to Teague in 1945, he started dating Corin Neyland Stroud. They were married October 11, 1947, and moved to Houston" ......He had multiple Sclerosis and had to quit work....He was in bed the last four years of his life....He died July 6, 1969. (History of Freestone County, Volume II, story # 270, pages 240-41, Forke, Howard Beall by Corin Neyland Stroud Forke.)


Corin had two children: 


Phillip Edwin Stroud( b. 6-3-1943)

Barbara Kay Stroud (b.9-26-1944)

Corin served on the Multiple Sclerosis Board of Houston for ten years. She worked for Armco Steel for 32 years and retired on April 30, 1981. She then moved (back) to Teague. 


 Corin enjoys Ceramics, oil painting, painting on wood projects and materials, and needlepoint. 


Corin was nominated for Freestone County Senior Citizen. 


Corin has been a member of the Freestone County Historical Commission for one and one-half years and was appointed Chairman of Volume II, (History of Freestone County) and was instrumental in having  this volume published......





**************************

Linda Lucille Neyland-Epperson ( b. 8-15- 1925- d....)


**************************

Herbert (Herb)  Neyland, Jr. ( b. July 23, 1923 - d. 2-21-1985)

Herb is listed on Quilt Row 4 / Block XIX....Legacy found at History of Freestone County, volume II, story # 615. pages 389-90, Neyland, Thomas Herbert "Herb" by Corin Neyland-Stroud-Forke.

Thomas Herbert "Herb" Neyland, Jr., was born in Teague July 23, 1923 at Neyland's home on the corner of Elm and Nineth Avenue....and arrived in a hurry.When Herbert (father) left at 8 a. m. that morning to go to Dallas to market, Lucille (his mother) had her aunt and uncle in Corsicana to go out to the highway to tell him he had a son. ( Herb had two sisters, Corin and Linda).....Herb had a collie dog name "Dixie" that followed him everywhere.Herbert let "Herb" sweep the store (T.H. Neyland & Co) every morning.  ...he received 15 cents per day.  He saved enough money to buy his horse and was happy with his horse and saddle....He graduated from San Angelo High School in 1941.He attended the University of Texas in Austin and played on the golf team....he joined US Navy and reported in 1942.  He was sent to Mercer University and received his commission of Ensign at Notre Dame University.  He even went to Welesley (girls) College one summer.  He was transferred to Corvallis, California, to be paymaster.


He married Barbara Ann (Bobbie) Murray of Boston, ....January 11, 1945.  Herb was in the Navy until 1947.  He received discharges from the Supply Corp with rank of Lt.(jg).  He went to T.C.U. and got his degree, B.B.S. in Commerce.....


In January of 1975, T.H."Herb" Neyland was elected President and Chief Executive Officer of Astrodomain Corporation and President and Chief Executive Officer of Houston Sports Assn.., Inc.. the owner of the Houston Astros....


Herb and Bobbie had four children:


Sandra Neyland (b.2-20-1946)

Nancy Ann Neyland ( b.12-16-1952)
Robert Michael Neyland (b. 12-16-3-1-58)
Becky Ann Neyland ( b. 1-26-1967)

Bobbie died July 8, 1978

Herb died 2-21- 1985


*************************
Thomas Whaley (Tom) Sims, Jr. b. 7-10-1874 d. 1-7-1943, son of Thomas Whaley, Sr. and Malinda Rutherford Sims,)


****************************

Joseph Walter Sims b. 7-19-1880-d.Waco, Tx.


Son of Thomas Whaley Sims, Sr. and Malinda Rutherford Sims, was born July 19, 1880, in Fairfield, Texas.  He married Altie Lois Childs (b. 11-11-1882 - d. 1940) in Fairfield, Texas.  He then married Rose Camelet of Brennan, Texas in Waco, February 10, 1946. She died about 1950.


(History of Freestone county, volume II, story #781, page 463, Sims, Joseph Walter by Walter Edwin Sims)

"Walter worked for T.J. Hall in Fairfield. He moved to Teague and opened a store with Alec Dunn, as a partner.  About l913, the family moved to Hillsboro where Walter worked for Wilmer Sims and Taylor Sims (his cousins) in their dry goods store.  In 1923, the family moved to Waco and Walter traveled as a Representative for Waco Wholesale dry goods company until 1929 and then for A. B, Frank (of San Antonio) and later for Higginbotham-Bailey of Dallas.  About 1940, he opened a variety store in Waco and operated this until his health forced him to sell out about 1953. "


Walter and Altie had two children:

Walter Edwin Sims  (two children)
Altie Lois Sims-Nielsen (no children)


***************************


*******************
These two daughters are not listed on the signature quilt.

Mattie Rebeca Sims  - (died young)b.1-28-1872 / died in San Angelo, Texas

Linda Rutherford Sims - 8-25-1886 - d. 12-9-1890


****************

Miss Eula Sims


*****************

Mrs. Mack Sims... (Nancy Colgin b.5-23-1890 - d. unknown) 

History of Freestone County, volume I, story #753, page 574-75, Sims, Joseph Marion Heard by Mrs M. Heard Heron


....married Willie Mack Sims, son of Joseph (Joe) Heard Sims and Willie Roberts - Sims....Joseph Marion (Joe) Heard Sims is the son of Sterling Sims and Sarah Fitzpatrick Heard-Sims.....Joe was a merchant, landowner, cotton gin owner, owned his own home---a large three story structure in Cotton Gin....



************************

Miss Irene Sims


*****************

Mr. Edwin Sims 
(Son of Joseph Walter Sims, grand son of Thomas Whaley and Malinda Rutherford- Sims)


************************

Mrs. R. L. Sims ( Ethel Frankie Wilson - Sims) Wife of Robert Lee Sims.Robert Lee Sims...b.5-24-1883 d.10-3-65

( History of Freestone county, volume II, story # 783, page 464, Sims, Robert Lee by Mrs. Joe Bell, Jr.)


....the youngest living child of Tom Whaley Sims and Malinda Rutherford, Sims, was born May 24, 1883, in Cotton Gin, Texas. He married Ethel Frankie Wilson on July 19, 1905, at the Wilson Hotel, owned by her parents in Corsicana, Texas. ( They were married 60 years) Robert Lee Sims was a retired Cotton Belt System conductor, member of First Methodist Church, member of the Brotherhood Sunday School Class, a 32nd Degree Mason and a 50-year member Mason.  Robert Lee Sims died October 3, 1965, in Texarkana, Arkansas, and is buried in Oakwood cemetery in Corsicana. ...Ethel Wilson Sims died April 27, 1971.


They had three children:

Wilson Lee Sims
Helen Sims - Bartolomi
Linda Lee Sims-Wilson



**********************

Mr. R. L. Sims( Robert Lee Sims)Robert Lee Sims...b.5-24-1883 d.10-3-65

( History of Freestone county, volume II, story # 783, page 464, Sims, Robert Lee by Mrs. Joe Bell, Jr.)


....the youngest living child of Tom Whaley Sims and Malinda Rutherford, Sims, was born May 24, 1883, in Cotton Gin, Texas. He married Ethel Frankie Wilson on July 19, 1905, at the Wilson Hotel, owned by her parents in Corsicana, Texas. ( They were married 60 years) Robert Lee Sims was a retired Cotton Belt System conductor, member of First Methodist Church, member of the Brotherhood Sunday School Class, a 32nd Degree Mason and a 50-year member Mason.  Robert Lee Sims died October 3, 1965, in Texarkana, Arkansas, and is buried in Oakwood cemetery in Corsicana. ...Ethel Wilson Sims died April 27, 1971.


They had three children:

Wilson Lee Sims
Helen Sims - Bartolomi
Linda Lee Sims-Wilson



********************

Mrs J. W. Sims


****************

Mr. J. W. Simms


****************

Mrs. F. F. Sims...(...Possibly his second wife, Madge Keating of St. Louis, Mo, whom he married in 192....?)


*********************

Mr. F. F. Sims...( Frank Fitzpatrick Sims) 

(Frank ) married Corin Johnson (b.August 26, 1879 - October 26,1900) on December 24, 1895. Her legacy is found at History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #780, page 463. Her father was R.T. Johnson (b. 12-13-1830 / died 12-19-1890).Her mother was Sue M. Johnson (b.12-2-1847 / d. 3-19-1899)  Corin had two brothers, Lloyd and Walter Johnson. 


"Corin was a schoolteacher and also on the Examining Board in Austin for other teachers.

She painted very large oil paintings---48"x36"  They were "Christmas Morn", "Easter Dawn", "Pharaoh's Horses.  She also painted a three section screen.  She pieced quilts and embroidered where the pieces were joined.  All of these paintings and quilts were made during the early part of 1890s."

Frank and Corin had one daughter Ezra Lucille Sims born February 16, 1897. 


She died in childbirth , October 26, 1900. She and her infant son  were buried together in the Fairfield cemetery...."


Frank Fitzpatrick Sims - b. June 28, 1870 in Fairfield, Texasdied in 1952 

Mercantile owner in Cotton Gin and City Manager for Teague, Texas in the 1930's.


(History of Freestone county, Volume I, story #751. page 573) 


Oldest son of Malinda Rutherford and Thomas Whaley Sims, Sr.  Frank and his wife, Corin lived in Cotton Gin, Texas and Frank worked in a General mercantile store--one of the earliest stores in Freestone county.


" The Sims family has traced their family in this country through 27 generations. One of the earliest members of the Sims family to come to this country was Matthew Sims, who settled in Hanover County, Virginia in 1700.  Matthew came from Somerset, England.  Following the Revolutionary War quite a number of his descendants moved to Union County, South Carolina, and descendants from South Carolina group later moved to Georgia.  It was from the Georgia group that the Freestone County Sims family is immediately descended.  Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Sims (Franks' grandparents), their 4 children and 17 slaves arrived in Freestone county in 1852 and settled a few miles northwest of the present site of Teague and purchased 490 acres of land.


Thomas W. (Whaley) Sims, (Franks' father) was born January 26, 1845 in South Georgia and was one of the sons of the Sterling Sims family. Thomas fought in the Civil War and lost an arm and a brother  in the war. 


 Malinda Rutherford was born, June 4, 1849. Thomas and Malinda were married, September 8, 1869 in Cotton Gin, Freestone County, Tx. ...( Malinda owned a boarding house in Teague on Pecan Street and Sixth, after her husband died.)


Prior to her marriage Malinda attended the Fairfield Female College.  This college was established in 1857.  The fame of the college spread and young ladies from all over Texas and the southern states attended...."( Some of the  taught to female students at this college were :


Ancient languages ( Latin and Greek)

Moral and Intellectual philosophy
Mathematics
English literature

Ornamental Department / Graded preparatory department

*Embroidery
*Chenille
*Fancy Work
(20 week course that cost $15 per session)

Piano / music....$25 per 20 week course / Use of instrument $5.00


Drawing

Painting in Water colors, Grecian ornamental and oil painting...$20 / 20 week course.


*********************************

(Frank ) married Corin Johnson (b.August 26, 1879 - October 26,1900) on December 24, 1895. Her legacy is found at History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #780, page 463. Her father was R.T. Johnson (b. 12-13-1830 / died 12-19-1890).Her mother was Sue M. Johnson (b.12-2-1847 / d. 3-19-1899)  Corin had two brothers, Lloyd and Walter Johnson. 


"Corin was a schoolteacher and also on the Examining Board in Austin for other teachers.


She painted very large oil paintings---48"x36"  They were "Christmas Morn", "Easter Dawn", "Pharaoh's Horses.  She also painted a three section screen.  She pieced quilts and embroidered where the pieces were joined.  All of these paintings and quilts were made during the early part of 1890s."


Frank and Corin had one daughter Ezra Lucille Sims born February 16, 1897. 


She died in childbirth , October 26, 1900. She and her infant son  were buried together in the Fairfield cemetery...."


He then married Madge Keating...192__



Mr. Marion Sims...(Marion P. Sims of Houston, Texas,  gave insight of Sims family relationships with their slaves in the book Juneteenth At Comanche Crossing by Doris Hollis Pemberton, 1983,pages 37-38, Eakin Press, Austin, Texas.)


*******************************************************************



Row II / Block 7

*(corner names)

Mrs. Mark ------------------?
Mrs. (W ?) N. Sims
Mrs.----------C. Keys
Mrs. A. E. Colgin
************************
Mrs. Gilbert Ward
Helen Ward
Mr. Gilbert Ward
Mrs. N. J. Stringer
Mrs. R. G. Rodje----------t  (or Redfert)?
Miss. Martha Kennedy
Mrs. R. L.Kennedy
Miss Nell Donaldson
Miss Ruth Curry
Mrs. M. L. Keys ?
Mrs. Robert Keys
Mr. Roy Keys
Mr. M. M.? Simms
Mr. T. J. Simms
Miss Irene Sims
Miss Eula Sims


********************
*(corner names)

Mrs. Mark ----Sims?(Wife of Mark Sims who was son of George Sims,( Brother of Sterling Sims) and Frances(--)_Sims.  He died as a prisoner of war in Camp Hill, Alabama.)

Mrs. (W ?) N. Sims


Mrs.----------C. Keys


Mrs. A. E. Colgin.
..( Annie Elizabeth Drake) Mother of Vida Moss Colgin-Sims and second wife of Richard Ewing Colgin.




(History of Freestone county, volume II, story # 784, page 464, Sims, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. , by LeNere Sims Alderman)

Vida's father, Richard Ewing (b. December 31, 1839 -d. July 9, 1922), enlisted into the Confederate Army, Company D of the 10th Texas Infantry with Capt. Wilson Nelson's Regiment, Walker's Division.  He was captured but escaped and reported to Little Rock, Ark., where he was mounted as cavalry and attached to Young's Brigade.  In 1864 he was captured and sent to Elmira Prison.  When he was released 11 months later, he made trousers and jacket from his prison blanket in which to make his way home to Freestone County.....Richard Ewing was one of four children born to Richard Colgin and Elizabeth Wills...


Richard Ewing Colgin's family built the first smokehouse in Freestone county, Texas. 
They created the above product for curing smoked meats ( Called Colgin's Liquid Smoke).
Two years after his first wife, Mary Wallace Aycock's death, Richard married  Annie Elizabeth Drake (b. August 11, 1847 - December 21, 1932) . This union produced  seven children:...Vida Moss (b. April, 19, 1877, (was one of them.)

Children of Richard Ewing Colgin and Mary Wallace Aycock-Colgin were:

Frances Irene Colgin
Saladin Eugene Colgin

Children of Richard Ewing Colgin and Annie Elizabeth Drake were:

Vida Moss Colgin - Sims (born April 19, 1877)
Clay Wilma Colgin ( born April 3, 1878)
Roger Ewing Colgin (born October 14, 1881)
Thomas Guthrie Colgin (born December 20,1882)
Iona Elizabeth Colgin ( born February 17, 1885)
Richard Emory Colgin (born August 11, 1887)
Nancy Drake Colgin ( born March 3, 1890)


************************

Mrs. Gilbert Ward - (Helen Mar King daughter of Alston and Rebeca Sims King of Mexia, Texas) b. Unknown - d. December 22, 1972, 

History of Freestone County, volume II, story #903, page 518, Ward , Gilbert Cecil and Helen King


by Helen Ward Thomas



Helen Ward  ....(Helen Rebeca Ward, daughter of Gilbert and Helen Mar King - Ward) Married Robert C. Thomas and lives in Dallas, Texas.


History of Freestone County, volume II, story #903, page 518, Ward , Gilbert Cecil and Helen King


by Helen Ward Thomas


Mr. Gilbert Ward (Gilbert Cecil Ward, b.    d. August 31, 1961) 


History of Freestone County, volume II, story #903, page 518, Ward , Gilbert Cecil and Helen King


by Helen Ward Thomas

"Gilbert Cecil Ward, son of Jasper Ward and Mary Elizabeth (Molly) Brooks Ward, was born in Palestine, Texas.  The family moved to Galveston when Gilbert was almost two years old.  Later they lived in Houston and Orange, Texas, where his father died.

In 1907, Gilbert came to Teague with his mother, Sister, Helen and two brothers, Haines and Sam. He had two older brothers, Walter and Will, who by that time were grown and living away from home.  His sister, Helen, later married Loften Boyd.( Uncle of W.R.Boyd, Jr. at Quilt Row 5 / Block 22 on this signature quilt)  Upon coming to Teague, Gilbert and Haines began work for the railroad as machinist apprentices.

Gilbert married Helen Mar King on September 3, 1913.  She was the daughter of Alston and Rebeca Sims King of Mexia.  They lived in Teague, Yoakum, and Sherman for the next several years while he continued working for the railroad. 

Gilbert and Helen Ward returned to Teague after he had made the decision to leave the railroad, and he and a partner established a new business.  The partner was Homer Sledge, and the business carried the name "Ward and Sledge". They covered a wide field of sales and services, including plumbing, contracting, gutter installation, top lines of appliances, and later, refrigeration and Glidden and DuPont paints.

The business grew and was later moved to a larger building on Main Street, and a second location was added in Fairfield.  The partnership was dissolved in 1941 and the store became "Ward Plumbing and Appliances", which was still in operation when Gilbert Ward passed away August 31, 1961...."

*(The family lived at 603 Cypress in Teague, Texas.)


Mrs. N. J. Stringer


Mrs. R. G. Rodje----------t (or Redfert)?



********************************

Miss. Martha Kennedy...( May have been the daughter of Reuben Kennedy...civil war soldier.)???

Mrs. R. L.Kennedy.... ( May have been the wife of Reuben Kennedy...civil war soldier.)???

History of Freestone County, volume II, story #373, page 282, Hugue, Josiah Franklin, by Melva F. Hogue

"Mr. Josiah Franklin Hugue was " Enlisted in the Confederate Army at Fairfield, Freestone County, Texas, October 1, 1861, as a Private in Company D. Tenth Texas Infantry, Granbury's Brigade, Pat Cleburne's Division, Hardee's Corps.  Army of Tenn."....Was in the battles of Arkansas Post, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, New Hope Church , Kennewaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro and in fact we were fighting from Dalton to Atlanta. 


Col. Nelson was promoted to Brigadier General in 162, and R.Q. Mills was made Colonel. Gen. Nelson died soon after he was promoted. Captain Wilson resigned on account of bad health and John L. Wortham was made Captain, who died in Arkansas in 1862.  Then Reuben Kennedy was Captain until the close of the war...." (Civil War)



**************************


Miss Nell Donaldson....(Nell Wooten) married Clyde Cornelius Donaldson. 


They had one son:


Wayne Donaldson who married Dixie Franks. 


(History of Freestone County, volume I, story #273, page 343, Donaldson, Thomas Rufus, by Mrs. Dale Willard

******************************

Miss Ruth Curry 
 ...a teacher with the Teague School District.

 ( History of Freestone County, volume II,  story #221,page 218, Edwards, Doris by Doris Edwards-Threadgill



Mrs. M. L. Keys ? 


Mrs. Robert Keys ...Edna Lucas, married Robert Bera (R.B.) Key6-11-1902. "He was the fifths of twelve children born to Owen Denton Key and Alvira Ann Grim Key, (History of Freestone County, volume II, story # 429, page 308, Key, Owen Denton by his granddaughter, Martha Tisdale Moore.)"


History of Freestone County,Volume II, story # 230, page 309, Key, Robert Berea (Bea) by Velma Key Mooneyhan


"Edna was born in Hempstead, Arkansas 1-9-1878, named Isabella Louisa Rogers, but at the age of one month her mother died and Tom E. Lucas, a Baptist minister, and his wife, Lila M., took her to raise and called her Edna Imogene Lucas although she was not formally adopted. Her father, Stephen Roger was born in Palermo, Sicily and her mother, Janie (Belk) Rogers was born in London, England.  Edna had five sisters and two brothers:


Benedetta Emma Rogers

Frances (Florence Maud) Rogers
Janie Belk Rogers
Rosa Anne Rogers
Angela (Annie) Rogers-Lylas
Horace Belk Rogers (died in infancy)
Joseph (Joe) James Duncan Rogers

R.B. was a handsome, eloquent charismatic speaker, holding his audiences spell bound, speaking at schools and church gatherings.  He was ordained into the ministry when quite young, and was prominent in the Baptist ministry, pastoring churches in Texas, Florida and Arkansas.  Among them are First Baptist Church in Palmer, Texas, Second Baptist Church in  Corsicana, Texas, Emanuel Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida.  He also pastored churches in grosbeck, Rice and Feenett, Texas.  He preached on radio stations in Florida and Canada and was a writer of pamphlets and sermons.  He loved to "debate" the Holy Scriptures and was working on a Commentary of the Book of Revelations at the time of his 

death.  A postcard sent to his mother in 1906 states "just landed from Moscow" and mentioned enjoying the debates.  Bea was musically talented, playing the organ and violin.  He had a beautiful singing voice and was a writer of songs and music and poetry.  His father, Owen Denton Key, loved to relate to family and friends how Bea stood on tree stumps and "preached" when just a boy."

R. B. and Edna had seven children:


Adina Ruth Key b. 11-23-1903 / d. 10- 1- 1906


Newburn Conway Key b. 4-14- 1906 / d.1- 9- 1987


Erie Lorene (Renee') Key b. 4-10- 1908 / d. 9- 7 1980


Robert Beara Key, Jr. b. 6 - 30 - 1910 / d. 2-7, 1977


Edna Nadine Key b. 9-9-1912 / d. 12 -18- 1985


Velma Gertrude Key b. 3-7-1914 / d. unknown


Edward Denton Key b. 4-10-1916 / d. unknown


R. B. died 1 -30 - 1948 at his home west of Teague on Hwy.84.

Edna died 1 - 24 - 1973 in Waco, Texas. They are both buried in the New Hope Cemetery.


*************************************

Mr. Roy Keys


Mr. M. M.? Simms


Mr. T. J. Simms ( Taylor Jackson Simms) Married 1st wife, Martha Helen Ferrell, 2nd wife, Fannie Cottondale.)
Miss Irene Sims


Miss Eula Sims



********************************
Notes:

Two of the sixteen slaves brought with the Sterling Sims family are "Uncle Billy Sims and Joe Preuitt. Details on each one are revealed below:

1. Uncle Billy" Sims.....his legacy is told in History of Freestone County, Volume I, story # 752, page 574,Sims, Joseph H. by Madalyn Heron Hass.

**( I have not been able to identify Joseph H. Sims as a being listed on Lone Star Braggin' signature quilt, but his story gives much insight into the relationship between slaves and slave master in the Sims family of Simsboro, Texas...so I have included a quote from his story at this point to acquaint the reader more so with the Sims family as a whole.)Story of Joseph H. Sims, youngest son of Sterling Sims, as told to me by my brother, Mack Heron, about our Grandfathers.

The "SIMS" family has always been prominent, progressive, hard working people, and meant much to this part of the country, of which we the descendants are proud."


***************************************

" When our great grandfather, Sterling Sims, his 3 brothers, their families and 16 slaves came here from Florida, it took them approximately 5 years to reach Freestone County. The The Sims family left New Jersey, and first came to Florida in hopes of settling there, but when the young were born, they would die because of malaria,....They then decided to come to Texas....They had to go into Georgia....They spent 1 winter in Mobile, Alabama, 2 winters and 1 summer near New Orleans and 1 winter on Galveston Island. Thence they traveled by barge up the Trinity River, to the mouth of Keechi creek. They followed Keechi creek to what is now known as Buffalo Hole. They settled on the spot which was given the name 'SIMSBORO'...This location was chosen because there was plenty of wood and water available.....The Sims ancestors, we are told, were largely Silversmiths by trade. After moving to this locality, they could no longer follow this trade... they turn to iron work and the building trade. We are told, grandpa Sterling Sims built houses in Wortham, Hubbard and Tehuacana. The slaves worked right along with their owners and were taught many trades. They were treated well. They were freed before the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865. Four decided to stay with the Sims family, 1 died shortly, 2 finally left, and 1 affectionately known as "Uncle" Billy"remained....
Both our grandparents are buried in the Cotton Gin Black Cemetery. Uncle Billy, as referred to previously, was a most trusted slave. He was chosen to be my grandfather's driver......Uncle Billy is buried in the Cotton Gin Cemetery. My grandfather inscribed by hand, on his tombstone: ' in memory of Uncle Billy Sims, age 78 ears, 'by his Masyer'....Shortly before my grandfathers death, he had a new smaller stone erected with the same wording, which still stands...



********************************


Note:
Uncle Billy Sims is featured in the book..Juneteenth at Comanche Crossing (1983)
by 
Doris Hollis Pemberton, 
pages 37-38.......


Mrs. Pemberton mentions in her book that.....

" Marion P. Sims of Houston made available information that his ancestors came from New Jersey to Florida and were temporarily in Alabama, Georgia, and New Orleans. Their destination was Freestone County where the patriarchs, Sterling Sims and his three brothers were the founders of Simsboro in the late 1850s. The Sims family manumitted their sixteen slaves when they moved to Cotton Gin.
Due to the tradition of the Sims family to work along with their Slaves, these freed women and freedmen acquired know-how in such rare crafts as making, repairing and re plating articles of silver. Some of them were in demand for their skills in the building trades. Joseph H. Sims was a builder of fine homes in Cotton Gin and Wortham in Freestone county and in Tehuacana in Limestone county.

Billy Sims (Uncle Billy) was among four freedmen who chose to remain with the Sims family. He took pride in his physical strength and personal appearance. He was permitted to turn his duty of driver into a job of driver of the spectacularly handsome team of draft horses to and fro for heavy supplies.

He was seventy - eight when he died. His former master buried him in the Black section of the Cotton Gin cemetery. He wrote the inscription on the tombstone he placed on the grave site...."

*************************************** 

Many Sims / Simms family descendants are listed on the two signature quilt blocks featured above. 

******************************** 

NOTES ON UNCLE BILLY SIMS DESCENDANTS


The photo above of Andrew Sims, is in the Smithsonian Collection



During the depression years interviews were conducted with former slaves by the Federal Writers' Project (1936-1938 ), (a government project that created jobs for writers). Their purpose was to try and save the life experiences and stories of as many ex-slaves as possible. Andrew Sims, a former slave of the William Driver family of Freestone County, Texas, reveals in his interview in the book TILL FREEDOM CRIED OUT by T.Linsey Baker and , ...that his father was "Bill Sims". "Uncle Billy" as he was called by the Sterling Sims family and others, was a most trusted family slave and held the position of family driver. He was allowed to leave the plantation to do important tasks such as picking up heavy supplies from local establishments. Andrew's mother was Kizzie Driver. In this book he explains how his mother and father came to be slaves in America and how they eventually met and became his parents.

Note: The Sterling Sims family and the William Giles Driver family were connected as relatives in that William Giles' Driver (b.1834-d....) married Mary Grover ( b....d. 1869. Mary the first person to be buried in Driver Cemetery) , the daughter of Elizabeth Heard (b. 4-9-1840 d. 1-3-1861) and William M. Grover (b. 4-20-1836).  Elizabeth Heard was the sister of Sterling Sims wife Sarah Fitzpatrick Heard, Sims. Thus Sarah Fitzpatrick was Mary Grover's Aunt.

 William Giles Drivers' brother, Julius Allen Driver( b. 1836 - 10-8- 1885), married Mary Grover's sister, Sarah Jane Grover (b. 9-9-1840- d. 3-31-1883).

 History of Freestone County, volume I, story # 276, Driver Julius Allen .


*****************

Andrew Sims, owner was William Giles Driver,(History of Freestone county, volume I, stories # 275, 277) , who owned another  slave named Winnie Sims, ( she may have been Andrews' sister). Her history is told in History of Freestone County, Texas, Volume II, story # 479 and Winnie's daughter, Sophie Lewis'(wife of Ben Lewis) personal history is featured in the same volume at story #475. Ben and Sophie had (8) children.

They are:

Louis
Andrew
Minerva
James
Berry 
William
Florida
Hassie
*************
Note:

Florida and Hassie both came to have children by, another Sims family slave named Joe Preuitt. (Joe Preuitts' story is told below).


*****************

Andrew Simms: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project 1936-1938

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 Oklahoma Narratives, Volume XIII Andrew Simms.  Age 80. Sapulpa, Okla.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20785/20785-h/20785-h.htm#Page_295

"My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn't know each other in Africa but my old Mammy (Kizzie Driver) told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. 

She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the same boat, I dunno. 

They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver.( The Drivers and the Sims were related thru the maternal line of their wives... The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plantation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms—that's the name pappy kept after the War. 

Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets 'round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That's what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn't get married. The Master's say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the War. ....

Then when I was four year old along come the War and Master Driver takes up his slaves and leaves the Florida country and goes way out to Texas..... 

Texas, that was the place, down near Fairfield. That's where I learn to do chores. But the work was easy for the Master was kind as old Mammy herself and he never gave me no hard jobs that would wear me down. 

All the slaves on our place was treated good. All the time. They didn't whip. The Master feeds all the slaves on good clean foods and lean meats so's they be strong and healthy.

Master Driver had four children, Mary, Julia, Frank and George. Every one of them children kind and good just the old Master. They was never mean .... 

I didn't see no fighting during of the War. If they was any Yankees soldiering around the country I don't remember nothing of it. 

Long time after the War is over, about 1885, I meets a gal named Angeline. We courts pretty fast and gets married. The wedding was a sure enough affair with the preacher saying the words just like the white folks marriage. We is sure married. 

The best thing we do after that is raise us a family. One of them old-fashioned families. Big 'uns! Seventeen children does we have and twelve of them still living. Wants to know they names? I ain't never forgets a one! There was: 

Lucy (Sims) _( There is a Lucy Sims, that may be Uncle Billy Sims' daughter ,who is featured in Eli Leon's exhibit catalog called Models in the Mind, Page 39, published c. 1992....about African American quilt makers. The following was written about her:
"Lucy Sims, born c. 1874 -died 1941......lived in Mt. Zion (Mt. Zion community , 5 miles east of Fairfield, Texas) and Galveston, Texas. During the winter she was always piecing or she and her neighbors would meet at one another's houses to quilt and have a midday dinner.  The women took turns quilting and cooking or might sit on the sidelines, piecing. 
Sims had a quilting frame suspended from the bedroom ceiling on ropes; they had to be put up at night.  The winter weather was bitter cold and blankets were unheard of; people made their own quilts. 
The wild Goose Chase, her only surviving quilt, was given to her daughter, Texanna Jones, soon after it was completed, around 1925."




http://www.elileon.com/
African American Quilt maker,Lucy Sims was featured in this exhibit
and catalog in 1992 by Eli Leon
.
****************

Bill (Sims) 

Ebbie(Sims) 

Cora (Sims) 

Minnie (Sims) 

George (Sims) 

Frank (Sims) 

Kizzie (Sims) 

Kecie (Sims) 

Andrew(Sims) 

Joe (Sims) 

Sammie (Sims) 

David (Sims) 

Fannie (Sims) 

Jacob (Sims) 

Bob (Sims) 

Myrtle (Sims)

All good children. Just like their old pappy who's tried to care for 'em just like the old Master takes care of their old daddy when he was a boy on that plantation down Texas way......"

Source:
American Life Histories from the Library of Congress

**********************************************************

2. Joseph (Joe) Preuitt...

History of Freestone county, Volume II, story # 683-685, pages 420-21


"Joe Preuitt was born in Virginia, a slave, in 1824.  His parentage is unknown.  He was living on the Grover-Sims plantation at the time that slavery was abolished.  Upon Emancipation, at the end of the Civil War, at the age of 41, Joe gave himself the surname of "Preuitt".  The surname is deliberately spelled with a silent "e" so that continuing descendants will know their roots are firmly grounded with their forefather, Joe Preuitt.

Joe' occupation as a brickmason when he was young later expanded into farming and running his own delivery service.  He was a member of the A.M.E. Church.  Upon Emancipation ....Joe worked tirelessly until he bought farm property in Teague. He became prosperous at his work.

At age 46. the 6'2", Joe had Jonas Lewis by Florida Lewis of Teague, Texas.  (History of Freestone county,volume II, story #684, page 420, Preuitt, Jonas Lewis).  

He later married Hassie Lewis of Teague and they had four children:

Joe Preuitt, Jr.
Beatrice Preuitt
Martha Preuitt
Anne Preuitt (died as an infant)

After the birth of his second son he was known as "Old man Joe Preuitt", as he was 64 years old at the time of the second sons' birth.

After he neared death and after the death of his wife, Hassie, he legitimized the first son by claiming paternity in court documents at the Freestone county court house.  From then on Jonas Lewis was known as Jonas L. Preuitt. Joe stated that Jonas would be the administrator of his will so that his younger son and daughters would be cared for after his death.  Joe Preuitt died at the age of 73 in Cotton Gin on May 28, 1897.  His eldest son , Jonas, then age 27, took care of his younger brother Joe, Jr. , age 9 and he carried out the will of his father.  Joe's land was distributed to his heirs who own it to this day. His delivery service was continued by his son Jonas L. Preuitt."

(Sharon R. Jones-Munoz, great grand daughter of Joe Preuitt authored this biography from information gained from her mother / his grand daughter, Gladys Hortense Preuitt-Jones.

***************************

"Jonas Lewis (Preuitt) was born on November 28, 1870, to Florida Lewis, age 25, and Joe Preuitt, age 46, both of Teague, Texas, Freestone County, Texas.  He grew up to be 6'6".....Jonas Lewis married Mahala, on December 27, 1888. This marriage ended in divorce on July 25, 1890....

One day, while riding his team of horses through town he met the spinster school "marm", Virginia Amy Reynolds  ( History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #685,pages420-21, Preuitt, Virginia Amy Reynolds, by Amy Marie Jones-Bazadier) ,the eldest child of James and Oma Reynolds, was duly impressed with his horses, business and farming acumen.  Jonas and Virginia were married at her home in Springfield, on August 25, 1901, with Eli Medlock and Virginia Purtle was witnesses and Reverend James Hutchinson of the Springfield M.E. Church officating.  Jonas and Virginia had thirteen children:

Juanita Erma Preuitt
Ralph Long Preuitt
Jane Lou Preuitt
Ogna Oma, Preuitt
Marie Bolden Preuitt
James Clarence Preuitt
Saint Valentine Preuitt
Vinetta Vedalia Preuitt
Loomis McAdoo Preuitt
Reynolds Daphne Preuitt
Gladys Hortense Preuitt -Jones--( Gladys' children are Amy Jones-Bazadier, Joy Jones-, and Sharon Jones-Munoz 

Preuitt Family Historical Note:


In the Sims family it is to be noted that the women were seamstresses, crafts persons, artists and quilt makers. Also many who married into the family , whether slaves or whites were trained and skilled to perform these varied tasks.


 Because there was the tradition of teaching their slaves usable life skills and working alongside them, several wonderful quilts have emerged not only in the white Sims family lineage...but also in the lineage of their slaves.


Sharon Munoz and her daughter, Achera Munoz have become the inheritors / safe keepers of a wonderful old quilt with a wing design that is attributed to their ancestor, Florida Lewis who was an emancipated slave. This quilt was featured in a traveling exhibit hosted by the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum , February 10, 2009. (See quilt below)






BOB BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM / FORGOTTEN GATEWAY EXHIBIT

Exhibition Covers History of Galveston Island as a Trans Oceanic Port of Immigration and the Socioeconomic Impact of Immigrants on Texas Between 1845 and 1924 

.....This new traveling exhibit chronicle{d}The Port of Galveston’s largely forgotten history as a major gateway to American immigration from 1845 to 1924. Forgotten Gateway builds on a growing scholarly and public interest in the history of migration patterns to America and Galveston’s place (as one of the nation’s top immigrant ports) in that history.

“This is the first time that Galveston’s legacy as a port of entry has been fully explored on a national scale,” said Nashid Madyun, director of the Texas State History Museum. “Everyone knows the role that Ellis Island played in American history. Few people know that long before Ellis Island processed its first immigrant, Galveston had been the port of entry to hundreds of thousands of people who helped settle Texas and the American MidwestTexas’ growth and development would have been very different without the impact of immigrants who came through Galveston.”

While New York’s Ellis Island’s location made it a natural port for Europeans, Galveston attracted a diverse group of people from Europe, Mexico, South and Central America and even Asia In addition, before the Civil War, it was a major port for forced migration – the sale and transport of slaves from Africa and other points in the United States to Texas.

The exhibit highlights enduring humanities themes in the history of immigration including: the dangers of the journey; making a life in a new land; navigating bureaucracy; confronting discrimination; and becoming “American.”  ........
                                                                  **********
 This beautiful quilt (was) one of
         200+ original artifacts .... featured 
        in this amazing exhibit which (was) funded by the
          National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)...

*************************************

J. C. Preuitt ( a twin )
K. C. Preuitt ( a twin)

*Note: Juanita and James died in the 1918 Flu epidemic.  K.C. died hours after his birth.

Jonas was a Freemason, farmer, businessman, Methodist and tireless worker. Jonas was prosperous, he was instrumental in building the St. Paul A.M.E.  Church in Teague which is still used to this day.  He also built many homes in the Freestone / Limestone counties that are still standing to this day.....By the 1930's between managing his mother's , father's farms and his own farm, fighting ... legal disputes, age and living during the depression, he was forced to focus his attention on his own farm...His mother's farm 'went up ' for back taxes during 1933.

Virginia taught school throughout their marriage. She heard about the auction of their mother-in-law's property and immediately went to Fairfield, where at the steps of the Freestone County Court House, she purchased the property of her mother-in-law, Florida Lewis.  Thus, the property to which Jonas and his sisters, Amanda, Vedalia, and Mattie were heirs, became the legal property of his wife, Virginia Amy Reynolds Preuitt.  This property included portions of the Ben and Sophie Lewis estate to which Florida was heir.  The property continues to be owned by the heirs of Jonas and Virginia Preuitt and is known as the P.J. Ranch.  

Jonas Preuitt died March 7, 1940 from diabetes and a cut that would not heal properly...thus becoming gangrenous. He was 69 years of age."

*********************

(History of Freestone County, Volume II, story #685, pages420-21, Preuitt, Virginia Amy Reynolds by Amy Marie Jones-Bazadier)

"Virginia Amy Reynolds was born on August 15, 1879, in Honest Ridge, Limestone County.She was the eldest daughter of Oma Melton-Reynolds (b.7-7-1858 / d. 2-13-1897) and James Reynolds ( b. 2-28-1855 d. 10-28-1947).

Her mother, Oma , was born a slave in Arkansas , the daughter of Hiram Melton (1832-1872) and Nellie Medlock-Melton (b. 6-7-1835 / d. 5-7- 1917) and grand daughter of David "Dave" Medlock ( b.1815-d. unknown).

Her father, James, was born in Boyce, Rapier county, Louisiana, the son of Tom Reynolds( 1827, Lake Charles, Louisiana-d. 1865)  and Alice Davidson (b. 1835 - 1858).  He was "going to California" to start life a new as the Civil War had destroyed that he and his siblings, Clarence, Alice, Clara, Hannah, and Lulu had ever known.  James went as far as Springfield, Limestone county, Texas, where he met Oma and they married on November 12, 1878.  
*************************
Historical Note:

James would later , with other members of the community, buy land at Comanche Crossing, Limestone county, Texas, to be used to celebrate the notice of Emancipation on June 19th by the descendants of those who were emancipated in 1865.


***************************

James was an educated man who instilled in his children the value of education.  He tried his luck at farming where his luck just about ran out.  Still Oma and he had twelve children:  

Virginia
Walter
Laura Ann
Thomas 
John Dee ( who became a Professor of Mathematics at Grambling College in Louisiana)
Ella Nora
James Jr.
Lulu Belle
Hattie Grey
Minnie Maude
Napoleon Bonaparte

Oma died shortly after Napoleon's birth and James raised the children alone.  He insisted his daughters learn how to sew and his sons learn building trades and all of them to be educated.

Virginia went to Prairie View College in Hemstead, Texas. At 16 she began her teaching career. At the "spinsterish" age 21, the school "marm" happened to meet the 6'6", Sunday dressed, Jonas L. Preuitt who had gone to town driving his team of 'fine horses'..."

*******************************************
*** Revisions will be made to the information in this post as new 
details are revealed or uncovered in research efforts.


ENJOY!!!
Sherry Ann


THE END
***********************************************************

Related article
Enhanced by Zemanta

Followers

Google+ Followers

Networked Blogs

Follow by Email